Honoring a Leading Commitment to Conservation in Concert with Indigenous Peoples

On September 21, 2017, in the company of indigenous leaders and ACT staff, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos was honored at the National Geographic Society for his special leadership in environmental conservation and his commitment to the preservation of biodiversity. 

The ceremony included a special presentation to President Santos by ACT and leaders from the Murui-Muina, Inga, Kamentsa, Kogi and Arhuaco indigenous communities commemorating the expansion and establishment of reserves in the Amazon, Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Putumayo, and Caquetá.  

Learn more about this event here.

 

Better Protection for Chiribiquete, Northwest Amazon’s Most Important Protected Area

On July 12, 2017, the Colombian National Land Agency approved the expansions of the Puerto Sábalo Los Monos Indigenous Reserve by 413,100 hectares and of the Monochoa Indigenous Reserve by 154,790 hectares. The twin expansions effectively connect the largest national park in the country, the Chiribiquete National Park, with the largest reserve, the Predio Putumayo Indigenous Reserve, creating a vast conservation corridor in the Amazon region linking near 10 million hectares of protected lands.  

Learn more about this massive achievement here

 

ACT Field Notes

By: ACT-Suriname
Date: Thursday, April 13, 2017
Earlier this year, a completed series of Junior Park Ranger guides was presented during a special event in at the Tori Oso cultural center in Suriname’s capital city of Paramaribo. The purpose of the series is to enhance the awareness of both indigenous and non-indigenous students regarding Suriname’s extraordinary natural richness.
By: Wilmar Bahamón, ACT Middle Caquetá River Regional Coordinator
Date: Monday, March 20, 2017
On the banks of the Caquetá River, in Colombia, lives Elías García Ruíz, a member of the Murui Muina indigenous group who collects and cultivates native seeds such as that of the cacay tree (Caryodendron orinocense), which is disappearing from their territory because of selective logging of trees of high commercial value and an alarming advance of deforestation.
By: João Carlos Nunes Batista
Date: Friday, September 30, 2016
The Waurá of the Ulupuene village in the Xingu, Brazil came to us with a problem: their water supply had become contaminated by soybean crop pesticides. These pesticides are carried annually to the rivers of midwestern Brazil, often rendering the water unsuitable for human consumption. The Waurá had one request: clean water drawn from an open deep well with the support of the Amazon Conservation Team.

ACT in the Press

By:
Publication: Waterkant (December 2016)

The preliminary results of the two-year project "Capacity building of strategic groups for the sustainable use of natural resources and biodiversity conservation in Trio and Wayana living areas" were presented on Tuesday during a workshop at the Courtyard Marriott hotel in Paramaribo, Suriname.

By: Mike Gaworecki
Publication: Mongabay (December 2016)

Richard Evans Schultes is often referred to as “the father of ethnobotany,” a field of study that focuses on indigenous cultures and their use of plants. A new online tool lets anyone explore the Amazon rainforest along with him.

By:
Publication: Revista Arcadia (November 2016)

En 1941, Richard Evan Schultes realizó su primer viaje a la Amazonía colombiana como investigador asociado de la Universidad de Harvard. Tras sus peregrinaciones alertó a la comunidad internacional de la destrucción de la selva amazónica y el exterminio de las comunidades indígenas de la región.