Honoring a Leading Commitment to Conservation in Concert with Indigenous Peoples

On September 21, 2017, in the company of indigenous leaders and ACT staff, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos was honored at the National Geographic Society for his special leadership in environmental conservation and his commitment to the preservation of biodiversity. 

The ceremony included a special presentation to President Santos by ACT and leaders from the Murui-Muina, Inga, Kamentsa, Kogi and Arhuaco indigenous communities commemorating the expansion and establishment of reserves in the Amazon, Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Putumayo, and Caquetá.  

Learn more about this event here.

 

Better Protection for Chiribiquete, Northwest Amazon’s Most Important Protected Area

On July 12, 2017, the Colombian National Land Agency approved the expansions of the Puerto Sábalo Los Monos Indigenous Reserve by 413,100 hectares and of the Monochoa Indigenous Reserve by 154,790 hectares. The twin expansions effectively connect the largest national park in the country, the Chiribiquete National Park, with the largest reserve, the Predio Putumayo Indigenous Reserve, creating a vast conservation corridor in the Amazon region linking near 10 million hectares of protected lands.  

Learn more about this massive achievement here

 

ACT Field Notes

By: Minu Parahoe
Date: Friday, April 15, 2016
For a dedicated group of Matawai Maroon women who are cultivating pepper for income generation in villages along Suriname’s upper Saramacca River, ACT has provided an industrial pepper mill to alleviate their strenuous physical work.
By: Isidoro Hazbun
Date: Wednesday, March 30, 2016
María Patricia Navarrete Serna is the Program Coordinator for ACT’s large-scale project Connected Landscapes in a Fragua-Churumbelos Conservation Corridor in Colombia. We were able to interview her and learn more about her past work, her current projects, and why she enjoys working for the Amazon Conservation Team.
By: Minu Parahoe
Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2016
In September 2015, Anna Nantawi and Ketoera Aparaka, two Trio indigenous women from Suriname’s remote rainforest interior, departed for Rajasthan, India to begin a six-month solar power installation training course to benefit their community. On March 15, 2016, the women finally returned to Suriname.

ACT in the Press

By: Mike Gaworecki
Publication: Mongabay (December 2016)

Richard Evans Schultes is often referred to as “the father of ethnobotany,” a field of study that focuses on indigenous cultures and their use of plants. A new online tool lets anyone explore the Amazon rainforest along with him.

By:
Publication: Revista Arcadia (November 2016)

En 1941, Richard Evan Schultes realizó su primer viaje a la Amazonía colombiana como investigador asociado de la Universidad de Harvard. Tras sus peregrinaciones alertó a la comunidad internacional de la destrucción de la selva amazónica y el exterminio de las comunidades indígenas de la región.

By: Monica Andrea Saavedra Crespo
Publication: El Mundo (September 2016)

Mediante la firma de un convenio entre la Gerencia Indígena de Antioquia de la Gobernación y la Agencia Nacional de Tierras se espera dar solución a las solicitudes de titulación, ampliación y construcción de resguardos indígenas en el departamento.