Better Protection for Chiribiquete, Northwest Amazon’s Most Important Protected Area

On July 12, 2017, the Colombian National Land Agency approved the expansions of the Puerto Sábalo Los Monos Indigenous Reserve by 413,100 hectares and of the Monochoa Indigenous Reserve by 154,790 hectares. The twin expansions effectively connect the largest national park in the country, the Chiribiquete National Park, with the largest reserve, the Predio Putumayo Indigenous Reserve, creating a vast conservation corridor in the Amazon region linking near 10 million hectares of protected lands.  

Learn more about this massive achievement here

ACA and ACT launch forest monitoring initiative in Colombia

Amazon Conservation, in collaboration with Amazon Conservation Team (ACT), has just posted MAAP #63: Patterns of Deforestation in the Colombian Amazon

We are excited to present this initial collaborative analysis of the Colombian Amazon, a work that reflects an important partnership with our colleagues at Amazon Conservation and their MAAP Project. It is MAAP’s first report in the more interactive "Story Map" format, incorporating ACT's expertise with regard to this platform.

This report has two objectives: 1) Illustrate the major deforestation hotspots in the Colombian Amazon between 2001 and 2015 and 2) Focus in on one of the most important hotspots, located in the Caquetá department.

Read the report here

 

ACT Field Notes

By: Rudo Kemper
Date: Thursday, June 23, 2016
In 2015, the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT) began conducting participatory mapping fieldwork with the Matawai Maroons residing in ten villages along the upper Saramacca River of central Suriname. The process has been deeply enriching to all parties, with remarkable products.
By: Minu Parahoe
Date: Monday, April 25, 2016

The 2016 fieldwork for ACT’s joint project with the University of Utrecht and Surinamese universities is right around the corner. Since 2015, in southern Suriname, ACT has been conducting research in the Trio indigenous village of Kwamalasamutu, focusing on topics defined by the community.

By: Minu Parahoe
Date: Friday, April 15, 2016
For a dedicated group of Matawai Maroon women who are cultivating pepper for income generation in villages along Suriname’s upper Saramacca River, ACT has provided an industrial pepper mill to alleviate their strenuous physical work.

ACT in the Press

By:
Publication: Waterkant (December 2016)

The preliminary results of the two-year project "Capacity building of strategic groups for the sustainable use of natural resources and biodiversity conservation in Trio and Wayana living areas" were presented on Tuesday during a workshop at the Courtyard Marriott hotel in Paramaribo, Suriname.

By: Mike Gaworecki
Publication: Mongabay (December 2016)

Richard Evans Schultes is often referred to as “the father of ethnobotany,” a field of study that focuses on indigenous cultures and their use of plants. A new online tool lets anyone explore the Amazon rainforest along with him.

By:
Publication: Revista Arcadia (November 2016)

En 1941, Richard Evan Schultes realizó su primer viaje a la Amazonía colombiana como investigador asociado de la Universidad de Harvard. Tras sus peregrinaciones alertó a la comunidad internacional de la destrucción de la selva amazónica y el exterminio de las comunidades indígenas de la región.