Honoring a Leading Commitment to Conservation in Concert with Indigenous Peoples

On September 21, 2017, in the company of indigenous leaders and ACT staff, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos was honored at the National Geographic Society for his special leadership in environmental conservation and his commitment to the preservation of biodiversity. 

The ceremony included a special presentation to President Santos by ACT and leaders from the Murui-Muina, Inga, Kamentsa, Kogi and Arhuaco indigenous communities commemorating the expansion and establishment of reserves in the Amazon, Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Putumayo, and Caquetá.  

Learn more about this event here.

 

Better Protection for Chiribiquete, Northwest Amazon’s Most Important Protected Area

On July 12, 2017, the Colombian National Land Agency approved the expansions of the Puerto Sábalo Los Monos Indigenous Reserve by 413,100 hectares and of the Monochoa Indigenous Reserve by 154,790 hectares. The twin expansions effectively connect the largest national park in the country, the Chiribiquete National Park, with the largest reserve, the Predio Putumayo Indigenous Reserve, creating a vast conservation corridor in the Amazon region linking near 10 million hectares of protected lands.  

Learn more about this massive achievement here

 

ACT Field Notes

By: Wilmar Bahamón, ACT Middle Caquetá River Regional Coordinator
Date: Monday, March 20, 2017
On the banks of the Caquetá River, in Colombia, lives Elías García Ruíz, a member of the Murui Muina indigenous group who collects and cultivates native seeds such as that of the cacay tree (Caryodendron orinocense), which is disappearing from their territory because of selective logging of trees of high commercial value and an alarming advance of deforestation.
By: João Carlos Nunes Batista
Date: Friday, September 30, 2016
The Waurá of the Ulupuene village in the Xingu, Brazil came to us with a problem: their water supply had become contaminated by soybean crop pesticides. These pesticides are carried annually to the rivers of midwestern Brazil, often rendering the water unsuitable for human consumption. The Waurá had one request: clean water drawn from an open deep well with the support of the Amazon Conservation Team.
By: João Carlos Nunes Batista
Date: Thursday, September 15, 2016
An important piece of this effort is allowing Waurá youth to experience sacred sites that, until now, have only existed in their imaginations and the stories of their elders. Because of this effort, we were thrilled when we were given the opportunity for ACT to visit Kamukuaká Cave, one of these sacred sites, with several Waurá villagers from multiple generations.

ACT in the Press

By: Rick Kearns
Publication: Indian Country Today (January 2017)
Kichwa activists in Ecuador have a new tool for showing the oil-related theft of their territory: an interactive digital story map with details of how the land has been stolen — sold mostly to oil companies— and is still dangerous because of leftover explosives.
By: Alex McAnarney
Publication: El Pais (December 2016)
Gracias a la utilización de mapas disponibles aquí—, la Corte IDH pudo ver con claridad el impacto provocado por la actitud pasiva del Estado a la hora de retirar la pentolita, como la sentencia así indica, y las nuevas concesiones que afectarán a Sarayaku.
By:
Publication: De Ware Tijd (December 2016)
Over the past two years, 25 “Amazon Conservation Rangers” of the Trio and Wayana indigenous communities of Suriname have been trained in sustainable management of the forest as a natural resource; the training has been conducted by the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT) with partners.