Better Protection for Chiribiquete, Northwest Amazon’s Most Important Protected Area

On July 12, 2017, the Colombian National Land Agency approved the expansions of the Puerto Sábalo Los Monos Indigenous Reserve by 413,100 hectares and of the Monochoa Indigenous Reserve by 154,790 hectares. The twin expansions effectively connect the largest national park in the country, the Chiribiquete National Park, with the largest reserve, the Predio Putumayo Indigenous Reserve, creating a vast conservation corridor in the Amazon region linking near 10 million hectares of protected lands.  

Learn more about this massive achievement here

ACA and ACT launch forest monitoring initiative in Colombia

Amazon Conservation, in collaboration with Amazon Conservation Team (ACT), has just posted MAAP #63: Patterns of Deforestation in the Colombian Amazon

We are excited to present this initial collaborative analysis of the Colombian Amazon, a work that reflects an important partnership with our colleagues at Amazon Conservation and their MAAP Project. It is MAAP’s first report in the more interactive "Story Map" format, incorporating ACT's expertise with regard to this platform.

This report has two objectives: 1) Illustrate the major deforestation hotspots in the Colombian Amazon between 2001 and 2015 and 2) Focus in on one of the most important hotspots, located in the Caquetá department.

Read the report here

 

ACT Field Notes

By: ACT-Suriname
Date: Thursday, April 13, 2017
Earlier this year, a completed series of Junior Park Ranger guides was presented during a special event in at the Tori Oso cultural center in Suriname’s capital city of Paramaribo. The purpose of the series is to enhance the awareness of both indigenous and non-indigenous students regarding Suriname’s extraordinary natural richness.
By: Wilmar Bahamón, ACT Middle Caquetá River Regional Coordinator
Date: Monday, March 20, 2017
On the banks of the Caquetá River, in Colombia, lives Elías García Ruíz, a member of the Murui Muina indigenous group who collects and cultivates native seeds such as that of the cacay tree (Caryodendron orinocense), which is disappearing from their territory because of selective logging of trees of high commercial value and an alarming advance of deforestation.
By: João Carlos Nunes Batista
Date: Friday, September 30, 2016
The Waurá of the Ulupuene village in the Xingu, Brazil came to us with a problem: their water supply had become contaminated by soybean crop pesticides. These pesticides are carried annually to the rivers of midwestern Brazil, often rendering the water unsuitable for human consumption. The Waurá had one request: clean water drawn from an open deep well with the support of the Amazon Conservation Team.

ACT in the Press

By: Mirjam Gommers, Rudo Kemper, Bruce Hoffman
Publication: De Ware Tijd (August 2017)

For generations, indigenous people will talk about 'their' Keeng Kumu. His passion and talent have increased in value, through the enhancement and addition of modern technology. His passion for drawing maps of indigenous areas was supplemented with targeted training and resulted in a professional knowledge exchange.

By: Katie Dancey-Downs
Publication: Lush (April 2017)
In the Kichwa de Sarayaku community, technology and the natural world are joining forces to create a powerful coalition. Digital tools have become a weapon in the fight to protect the living forest which is home to this indigenous community, one of the oldest and most traditional settlements in Ecuador’s Amazon.
By: Rudo Kemper
Publication: Global Forest Watch (March 2017)
In 2016, the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT) received funding from the Small Grants Fund of Global Forest Watch (GFW) to evaluate the drivers of deforestation in threatened Amazonian ecosystems by training local indigenous communities to use the necessary technologies to ground-truth GFW alerts and collect pertinent field data.